The PTAB quietly hit a milestone in June in reversing Alice Section 101 rejections

As we have pointed out in a previous post, for more than a year, reversal rates for abstract idea (Alice) rejections have been extremely low. We are finally seeing an uptick of reversals likely due to Berkheimer and other Federal Circuit case law and recent guidance by the USPTO. As we’ve previously predicted, this reversal rate should continue (and may even go up). But until leadership at the USPTO clarifies its policies, it remains to be seen by how much.

As we’ve previously reported, from August 2016 to April 2017, the PTAB had months where it reversed abstract ideas in the 20 and 30 percentage range. That is, if a month had 100 abstract idea decisions, the Board would reverse the examiner on 20 or 30 of those cases. But May 2017 saw a dismal change in appellant fortunes: the reversal rate for abstract idea rejections tanked. For this period of over a year ago, many months saw only single digit reversal rates. Indeed, no month during this time exceeded a 15% reversal rate. The period was bad for Alice appellants.

abstractideareversals

But all this may be starting to change. Last month (June) saw a high number of abstract idea appeals decided, 176. Of those, 29 were wholly reversed, yielding a complete reversal rate of 16.5%.

It may be premature to characterize June as a watershed moment for patent eligibility at the PTAB. But there are three reasons for such hope.

First, June had a sizable number of reversals. In other words, the PTAB did not exceed a 15% reversal rate through a blip attributable to a small sample size. For some context, the number of reversals for the single month of June (29) was almost double the number of reversals for the six months between July 2016 and December 2016 (19).

Month Jul-16 Aug-16 Sep-16 Oct-16 Nov-16 Dec-16 Jan-17 Feb-17 Mar-17 Apr-17 May-17 Jun-17 Jul-17 Aug-17 Sep-17 Oct-17 Nov-17 Dec-17 Jan-18 Feb-18 Mar-18 Apr-18 May-18 Jun-18
Reversal Rate 33% 33% 27% 33% 29% 14% 28% 39% 20% 3% 11% 14% 15% 8% 15% 11% 14% 11% 14% 11% 10% 12% 9% 16%
Reversed 2 2 3 2 7 3 17 15 16 1 7 13 16 7 10 9 8 2 9 8 21 16 15 29
Total 6 6 11 6 24 22 60 38 81 31 63 94 108 93 68 83 56 19 64 73 203 137 172 176

Second, the number of decisions where the Board partially reverses an abstract idea rejection is increasing as well. In June, two decisions partially affirmed such rejections, pushing up the total rate with at least one claim reversed to 17.6%. March saw seven such decisions. These nine decisions for these months are more than the previous 9 months. The partial reversal rate tells a more complete story about how the Board is treating abstract idea rejections. As seen, the Board’s trend is toward increasing both the number of complete reversals and partial reversals. This means that the Board appears more willing to entertain dependent claims as patent-eligible, giving the appellant some options.

Finally, the Board is recently more holistically relying on both steps for reversing. We are starting to see a return to previous months where the PTAB has been more aggressive in reversing these types of rejections. Part of this is due to case law, which the Board follows. Berkheimer and Vanda guidelines may play a role. We previously noted that Berkheimer temporarily changed the way in which panels reverse. That is, whereas before panels primarily relied on Step 1 to overturn an abstract idea rejection, for a few months it was about even as to whether the Board uses Step 1 or Step 2 of the Alice/Mayo framework to reverse. June saw a return to the disproportionate reliance on Step 1 vs Step 2 reversal rationales (2:1). This goes to show that the Board may not be limiting itself to reversing cases just because of a single Federal Circuit decision (Berkheimer), but is developing a less erratic and more cogent way of deciding such rejections.

Why did the PTAB quietly hit this milestone in June? The PTO’s FOIA website, from which a majority of Anticipat’s data comes, has recently been delaying the time it takes to upload decisions to its page. Before a normal data upload would be a few business days and Anticipat Recap emails would play it safe by waiting until two weeks after a particular date to send a recap of a day’s decisions. So while we typically keep users updated on reversals using Recap emails after two weeks, for many days there have been no decisions to report on. Instead, we accessed this information by using the Research page.

After speaking with the USPTO’s webmaster, we were assured that the decisions will be more quickly uploaded going forward. This did not entirely assuage our concerns. So in the meantime, we are updating our Recap email functionality so that a user can modify the email settings to be sent in whatever way is most helpful to one’s practice. Stay tuned for updates very soon.

Berkheimer’s biggest effect on PTAB outcomes

After Federal Circuit decisions Berkheimer and Aatrix held that abstract idea inquiries required a factual finding, this blog predicted that the number of abstract idea rejection reversals at the Board would dramatically increase. The logic being that many examiners did not perform the rigorous analysis seemingly required for Step 2 of the Alice/Mayo framework in light of these Federal Circuit decisions. It has now been over 4 months since Berkheimer was decided and we can safely say that this dramatic change has not yet happened.

In fact, take the decisions involving abstract idea rejections in the year leading up to Berkheimer (March 1, 2017-March 1, 2018, accounting for some lag time after Berkheimer was decided). In this year, the 107 reversals over the 901 total decisions yields a reversal rate of 11.9%. Post Berkheimer (from March 1, 2018 to present), there have been 54 reversals over 525 total decisions. This reversal rate is 10.3%–lower than the pre-Berkheimer range. (All these decisions can be found using the Anticipat Research page)

But there has been something that has changed: the way that the Board performs its analysis. Historically, the Board has favored relying on step 1 of the Alice/Mayo framework by almost a 3:2 ratio. That is, for every three decisions where the panel reversed because the claims were not directed to an abstract idea under step 1, there were two decisions where the panel reversed because the claims recited something more than the asserted abstract idea under step 2. From March 1, 2017 to March 1, 2018, there were 63 step 1 analyses versus 35 step 2 analyses.

An important piece of the step 2 analysis is whether the claims recite an element or combination of elements that are more than well-understood, routine, or conventional elements. As the Federal Circuit has made clear, this inquiry is an element of fact. And Examiners have been charged in the recent Berkheimer memo to carefully apply factual bases to this step. So it would make sense that the Board, in light of Berkheimer, is reversing under this step more frequently than before.

And that is exactly what is happening. Recently, the two steps are equally used in reversing abstract idea rejections. From March 30, 2018 to present, the Board has used step 1 analysis to reverse 16 times while using step 2 an almost equal 15 times. This means that the Board has become much more receptive to arguments of step 2 in light of Berkheimer–even if the reversal rates have not noticeably increased.

The lower post-Berkheimer reversal rate is not easy to explain. It may stem from a confluence of factors. Perhaps applicants are getting more aggressive and appealing claims that are less patent-eligible. It could be that some applications that would otherwise be reversed if appealed all the way to a final decision are getting allowed at the appeal conference stage or earlier.

Regardless of the success rates of appealing abstract idea rejections, the change in the way that the board reversed these decisions highlights a good practice tip. Focus appeal argumentation on step 2 where appropriate. For those appeals that have long since been forwarded to the appeal, it is not too late to bring this up to the panel by way of an oral hearing. During the oral hearing, explaining the step 2 piece could be helpful to the panel, assuming that some sort of step 2 argument has been made. And of course when interviewing and otherwise responding to Office Actions in response to abstract idea rejections, step 2 has become a powerful step.

Tech center directors currently use their own appeal metrics for assessing examiners, but should use Anticipat data instead

The USPTO has a vested interest in knowing how well its patent examiners examine applications. It tracks production, efficiency and quality. Even though quality examination has always been tricky to measure, one metric comes pretty close: an examiner’s appeal track record. And while tech center directors have had access to this data, until recently this has been difficult to access. Here we explore the known gaps of how this metric is being used at the USPTO.

According to sources at the USPTO, directors–who oversee each technology center–have access to their Examiners’ appeal track records. The more an Examiner gets affirmed by the PTAB on appeal, the more reasonable the Examiner’s rejections, the theory goes. This means that directors can evaluate examiners based on how often an examiner gets affirmed.

The acceptable examiner appeal track record appears to depend on the director. An Examiner’s appeal track record with an affirmance rate significantly below the director’s average will attract attention. The USPTO as a whole has an affirmance rate at the PTAB that hovers around 60%. Different art unit groupings vary significantly from this global affirmance rate. Anything consistently lower than an affirmance rate average can put a question mark on the Examiner’s examination quality.

Even without knowing the specific contours of the acceptable affirmance rate at the USPTO, a look at the numbers can give an Examiner a general idea how well he/she is doing. This can help an Examiner proactively find out about these metrics before getting into trouble to guide his/her appeal forwarding strategy (Full disclosure: As a quality control metric, examiners do not appear to get punished in any way for being reversed).

While the USPTO’s appeal outcomes are available from other patent analytics services, they only use the USPTO’s outcomes that are based on how the overall decision was decided. See below.

appealrate

This decision-based outcome doesn’t communicate the issues that are causing examination problems (which issues are being reversed at the Board). By contrast, Anticipat provides a detailed breakdown of all an Examiner’s decisions. Examiners can thus easily pull up all of their appealed decisions and quickly see on which issues they were affirmed/reversed/affirmed-in-part.

On top of Examiner-specific data, Anticipat can identify rejections reversal rate outcomes across art units. For example, take obviousness rejections. Using Anticipat’s Analytics page for looking up over the past couple years in art unit 2172, in the computer/electrical arts, the pure reversal rate is about 18%. See blue sections of graph. This is lower than the tech center reversal rate of 27% and lower than the global USPTO reversal rate for this time. 2172

On the other hand, art unit 1631 in the biotech arts has a much higher reversal rate with a decision pool of about the same number. Specifically, art unit 1631 has a reversal rate of 43% for the past couple years. This is greater than its tech center reversal rate in 1600 of 26%.

1631

Finally, art unit 3721 in the mechanical art has an obviousness reversal rate much higher than both of the above examples. Specifically, 3721 is wholly reversed during the past couple years at 53%. This is higher than the tech center reversal rate of 44%, which is in turn higher than the global USPTO level. 3721

The granularity of appeal data can show what currently available data for appeals does not show: whether an Examiner is substantively doing a good job of examining applications. There are three reasons this is important for meaningful analysis of the metric.

First, as we’ve previously reported, the USPTO labels a decision as affirmed if only one rejection sticks to all pending claims. So the USPTO/director statistics and other patent analytics websites that provide this statistic of affirmance rate lacks the proper context. And without such context, the appeal outcome is an incomplete and even misleading metric.

Second, not all of the responsibility for low affirmance rates falls on the Examiner. For example, the two other conferees at the appeal conference can push applications to the Board that don’t have good rejections. But the Examiner-specific metric is a good starting point for any deviations to any norms. Anticipat allows for other Examiner lookups (including the SPE) to determine conferee track records.

A third reason for variance in Examiner appeal outcomes stems from the judges’ label of the outcome. While it is somewhat rare for a decision to have a newly designated rejection, it does happen. And as Bill Smith and Allen Sokal have recently pointed out in a Law360 article, decisions that have new designations are inconsistently labeled as affirmed or reversed. Sometimes the panel will reverse the Examiner’s improper rejection, but introduce a new rejection on that same ground with their own analysis. Other times the panel will affirm the Examiner’s improper rejection with its own analysis and be forced to designate the rejection as new. These small differences in patent judges’ preferences can impact an Examiner’s appeal profile.

Anticipat makes up for these shortcomings by providing greater context to outcomes and grounds of rejection. You can look at judge rulings in a particular tech center and identify patterns. For example, you can see whether panels tend to reverse or affirm when introducing new rejections.

Other valuable information, such as art unit and tech center data, can predictively guide an Examiner’s chances of taking an appeal to the Board. If a particular rejection consistently gets reversed on appeal, at the pre-appeal conference or appeal conference this knowledge can guide strategy to forward to Board based on the specific rejection at hand. Especially if the appeal consists of only a single issue.

With this increased granularity in appeal data there are only more questions to be answered. These specific questions currently have less clear answers. For example, to what extent are greatly disparate appeal outcomes the result of differing quality of examination? To what extent are Examiners across different tech centers evaluated based on appeal outcomes? Is there a point that an Examiner is considered to need improvement based on appeals outcomes? Could appeal outcomes–even if they include many reversals–affect the Examiner’s performance review? Likely not. But a better lens could prompt questions about disparate reversal rates across art units.

Expect the Berkheimer-driven patent-eligibility pendulum to swing at the PTAB

The past few months have seen huge developments in patent-eligibility at the USPTO. In three and a half years after Alice, the most effective way to argue against patent-eligibility for software applications was to focus on Step 1–that the claims are not directed to an abstract idea. But based on these recent developments, Step 2–that additional elements of the claims transform the judicial exception into something more–looks to be the more powerful way. The only problem is that the PTAB has not yet caught on. It will.

These huge developments have taken place in the form of Federal Circuit decisions deciding patent-eligibility favorably to the patentee, especially Berkheimer v. HP Inc., 881 F.3d 1360, 1369 (Fed. Cir. 2018). Such a clear articulation of the need for factual findings for Step 2 should usher in big change in how the Alice/Mayo framework is applied.

Then on top of the decisions came the revised USPTO Berkheimer memo last month. These guidelines emphasized that to establish under Step 2 that an additional element (or combination of elements) is well-understood, routine or conventional, the examiner must find and expressly support a rejection in writing with one of the four:

1. A citation to an express statement in the specification or to a statement made by an applicant during prosecution that demonstrates the well-understood, routine, conventional nature of the additional element(s).

2. A citation to one or more of the court decisions discussed in MPEP § 2106.05(d)(II) as noting the well-understood, routine, conventional nature of the additional element(s).

3. A citation to a publication that demonstrates the well-understood, routine, conventional nature of the additional element(s).

4. A statement that the examiner is taking official notice of the well-understood, routine, conventional nature of the additional element(s).

It should come as no small surprise to any practitioner that Examiners have not been including the above support in their Step 2 analyses for these additional elements of claims. This is no slight to the examining corps; it simply was never a USPTO requirement. So if the PTAB were faithful to the principles set forth in the guidelines, one would expect a dramatic turning of the tide.

While the PTAB is not bound to the USPTO examiner memos, it shouldn’t stray too far from them. Plus, it must comply with the Federal Circuit decisions, which are consistent with the guidelines. So one wouldn’t expect the PTAB to continue its practice of overwhelmingly affirming on Section 101. However, so far the PTAB has not significantly deviated from its previous course of mostly affirming judicial exception rejections.

Since April 19, 2018–the day that the Berkheimer memo was published–there have been 120 decisions that have decided judicial exceptions. Of these, only 13 have reversed, meaning a reversal rate of 11%. This 11% reversal rate is below the recently reported reverse rate for abstract ideas of 14%. It would appear that panels have not yet had the time to incorporate this new Step 2 framework into their decision-making. Or alternatively, they are preoccupied with the arguments raised by the appellant. Expect a greater number of request for rehearings on these.

Sooner or later, these PTAB judges should realize that many Section 101 rejections on appeal do not have the proper support for Step 2. This is not to say that these Examiners, on remand, could reformulate a proper rejection given another opportunity. While theoretically the judges could affirm the 101 rejections with a designation of new, the Board may not be well-equipped for to do so as this new requirement requires factual basis supporting Step 2. That is, the PTAB is a body that decides the propriety of pending rejections, not a body for searching and making such support findings. So expect a greater number of reversals to let the Examiners follow Berkheimer.

Update: These firms overturn abstract idea (Alice) rejections on appeal at PTAB

(Update: Kilpatrick was previously reported as having 4 reversals; in fact, it has 7)

A previous post showcased firms that successfully appeal abstract idea rejections at the PTAB. In that post, two firms stood out as clear leaders in overcoming the most difficult ground of rejection on appeal, Section 101 abstract idea. These firms were Schwegman Lundberg Woessner and Morgan Lewis. Five months later, we update the top firms to now add Kilpatrick Townsend and provide additional context of how many appeals it took to get there, with the aid of a recently introduced Customer Number lookup functionality.

Total Reversals for Abstract Idea Rejections (Numerator)

In an almost 2-year span post-Alice (July 25, 2016-April 30, 2018), there were 189 reversed abstract idea rejections on appeal at the PTAB. Of these, three firms–Schwegman, Morgan Lewis and Kilpatrick Townsend–were responsible for 11% of these reversals, with 7 reversals each. This is far ahead of the rest of firms. For context, the next closest firm had 3 abstract idea reversals on appeal. We discuss each of these three firms in more detail.

Total Abstract Idea Appeals (Denominator)

The first firm, Schwegman, took 42 abstract idea appeals to get its 7 reversals. This means that the reverse rate is 17%. This is a higher rate (more successful) than the average reverse rates for abstract ideas. From a comparison to other big patent firms, Schwegman pursues appeals for abstract idea rejections a lot more by a long shot. For comparison, during this window Knobbe Martens had 6 total abstract idea appeal decisions; and Fish & Richardson and Finnegan each had 19 total abstract idea appeal decisions.

But even with a more aggressive appeal strategy, Schwegman still maintains a higher-than-average reversal rate. And from the 204 total appealed decisions, almost a quarter have an abstract idea rejection. This suggests that a focus of the overall appeals includes in abstract idea rejections. Here is the firm’s information filters on the Anticipat Research page and the link to the Schwegman-filtered page here

schwegman

The second firm, Morgan Lewis, took far fewer appeals to get to its 7 reversals. It only appealed eight cases to get seven reversals. This translates into a reversal rate of 88% for abstract idea rejections. For a firm as big as Morgan Lewis, having only eight abstract idea appealed decisions is low compared to firms that are comparable in number of applications: Schwegman, Finnegan, Fish, Kilpatrick and Knobbe.

The overall number of appeals for Morgan Lewis during this time period is 52. This suggests that Morgan Lewis is conservative in pursuing ex parte appeals–not only for abstract idea rejections but in general. But when Morgan Lewis does proceed to appeal with a case (at least for Section 101 abstract idea rejections), it is very good at overturning such rejections. Again, the Research page and the Morgan Lewis-filtered Research page here.

morganlewis

The third firm, Kilpatrick, took 40 abstract idea rejections to get to its 7 reversals. This reversal rate of 18% is slightly above average, suggesting that Kilpatrick aggressively pursues appeals for this type of rejection. From 170 total appeals during that time period, it shows that abstract ideas make up a sizable part of the appealed rejections.  Kilpatrick Townsend-filtered Research page here.

kilpatrick

Conclusion

Each firm should be commended on the high number of abstract idea reversals. With such a difficult rejection, these firms are showing that one avenue of overcoming the rejection is by going straight to the Board for relief.

Context is extremely important for these statistics. Just because a particular firm has a higher reversal rate than another firm does not necessarily mean that the higher reversal rate firm is better. Perhaps the lower reversal rate firm is taking on more difficult cases. Perhaps the lower reversal rate firm had victories earlier in prosecution (like at the pre-appeal conference or appeal conference or even by responding to an Office Action) that are not counted in these statistics. But these statistics do show that when the Examiner conferees believe that an abstract idea rejection is proper, these firms know how to pursue a favorable outcome for their clients.

With a user account to Anticipat (sign up here for a free trial), you can lookup the above-discussed listing of reversed abstract idea decisions using the following links.

 

 

 

 

The State of Appealing Abstract Idea Rejections of Business Method Applications post-Alice

As seen from Anticipat’s daily recap emails, last month the PTAB reversed a slew of abstract idea rejections. As already discussed in our blog post, several of these reversals related to business method applications. Using Anticipat’s Research database to look even beyond last month, we see interesting results relating to trends of business method appeals outcomes.

The term “business method” has been broadly defined as “a method of operating any aspect of an economic enterprise”. Tech center 3600 includes broad categories of business methods. For example, three sets of art unit groups are listed below.

Here is a visual representation of the reversals over the course of almost the past two years. These are appeals that make it all the way to a final decision on tech center 3600 (Data from Anticipat Research.)

abstractidea3

The first interesting point is that last month’s 10 abstract idea reversals at first blush seems high. Only two other months in the last couple years have had higher numbers of reversals for business method rejections. From such numbers, one might think that the PTAB might be engaging in business method friendly behavior. But looking at the denominator of how many total abstract idea decisions of business method applications, a different picture is painted. It took 125 decisions to get these 10 reversals, a reversal rate of 8%. This is hardly business method friendly.

The second interesting point is that the number of appeals of abstract idea rejections for business methods is going up even as appeal production is going down. As pointed out by Ryan Alley, the PTAB’s opinion output for ex parte appeals is down from 2017. More concretely, in March of 2017, the PTAB decided a total of about 1650 decisions. In contrast, in March of 2018, the PTAB decided a total of about 930 decisions. Even with monthly variability of output (December 2017 and January 2018 had much lower output), it is telling that with such a dramatic drop for the same month, the number of abstract idea rejections decided increased substantially from 43 to 125. This goes to show that the trend is to appeal business method abstract idea rejections. This is especially apparent when looking at the total number of abstract idea decisions for business methods in months of 2016.

The reversal rate for these business method applications seems to be stabilizing at a low rate, as shown in the following graph. (Data from Anticipat Research.)

reversalratesabstract

For the past year, these abstract idea rejections for business method applications have been consistently reversed at about 10%. This is a very low reversal rate compared with all grounds of rejection. But as applicants choose to appeal rejections of their business method applications, even if the reversal rate stays low, it still means that a large number of such rejections will get reversed. That is, a 10% reversal rate of 120 applications still yields 12 reversals even if it took a lot of applications to get there.

In conclusion, Examiners will likely continue to reject business method applications as patent-ineligible abstract ideas and as applicants opt to pursue an appeal, the Board seems to be overturning the Examiner relatively infrequently. This may change, as case law continues to develop and as a new director of the USPTO Andrei Iancu has promised a new path which could include better application of Section 101. Use Anticipat Research to analyze trends of business methods or of other technology centers. Sign up for a free trial here.

 

Obviousness Reversal Rates Across Tech Centers: Unexpected Results

Obviousness is by far the most common rejection that gets appealed to the Board. This particular ground of rejection does not draw attention for being reversed at the low end or on the high end. Over the past year and a half, the 12,000 obviousness decisions were wholly reversed about a third (34%) of the time. And 43% of the appeals are at least partially reversed. One might expect these rates to be uniform across tech centers. They are not.

Here is a detailed breakdown of the appeals across tech centers.

Tech Center 1600 1700 2100 2400 2600 2800 3600 3700 total
Reversed 251 558 375 436 360 291 858 1000 4166
At least partial reversed 71 135 120 161 132 48 210 308 1205
Affirmed 649 1143 901 916 857 414 885 935 6796
Total 985 1876 1423 1536 1374 763 1973 2299 12397
Reversal rate 25% 30% 26% 28% 26% 38% 43% 43% 34%
At least partial reversal rate 33% 37% 35% 39% 36% 44% 54% 57% 43%

For appeals in tech center 1600, pharma/biotech, the reversal rate is the lowest. Only a quarter of such appeals are wholly reversed and only a third are at least partially reversed. The chemical arts of tech center 1700 are only slightly better.

Next, tech centers 2100, 2400, 2600 and 2800 comprise computer and electrical art. These are reversed at a higher rate than the biotech and chemical tech centers, with tech center 2800 being the most overturned of the bunch.

Next, tech center 3600, which is predominately software/business methods, has a much higher reversal rate than average. That is, 43% of these appeals are wholly reversed and 54% are at least partially reversed.

Next, tech center 3700, which is home to mechanical and medical device technology also has a much higher reversal rate than average. That is, 43% of these appeals are wholly reversed and 57% are at least partially reversed.

obviousness

It is interesting that the biotech/pharma and chemical tech centers are lower than the average reversal rates. It is also interesting that the software/business methods and mechanical/medical device tech centers are reversed at a higher rate than average.

Why are some tech center reversal rates higher than others? For obviousness, this is no simple inquiry and instead requires considerable context. It starts with how strong is the Examiner’s rejection. Some fields are more crowded than others, making it easier for an Examiner to find prior art that would show obviousness. The Board panel that decides these appeals are technically trained in the technology center that they decide cases. They evaluate the legal and factual merits of the appeal. And theoretically, the Board will objectively evaluate each appeal equally. So for some tech centers where the reversal rates are low, this may signal that Examiner rejections are stronger than tech centers where the reversal rates are high.

Another reason relates to how “well” do the appeal conference examiners forward to the Board. The examiner conferences serve as a gatekeeper by reopening prosecution or even issuing a Notice of Allowance for bad rejections. But if these examiner conferences forward these bad rejections to the Board more than others, then the reversal rate goes up.

A third reason relates to the judges not being completely neutral in their decision-making. Instead, some judges may lean toward the Examiner while others may lean toward the appellant.  The more the judges lean toward Examiners, the lower the reversal rate; the more the judges lean toward appellants, the higher the reversal rate.

Next, some technology centers may be made of aggressive applicants who may want to stretch the claim coverage into the gray area of what their applications deserve. Many applications that seek to cover pioneering technology will understandably be ambitious in its scope. Other applicants may be more interested in adding another number to their patent arsenals.

These less ambitious applicants may be less interested in broad claims and appeal only at a significant impasse with the Examiner or with a particularly unreasonable rejection. The collective aggressiveness of applicants could affect the reversal rate within a tech center.

Anticipat provides the proper context to make sense of how likely it is for an application to succeed on appeal, say, if faced an obviousness rejection. With Anticpat Research, you can quickly identify those applicants in your art unit or tech center to provide a holistic context to the reversal rate numbers. Also with practitioner analytics, you can now input a customer number to see how often a particular applicant succeeds on appeal. Comparing apples to apples takes away the unexpected and instead gives you power to incorporate the statistics into powerfully guiding your prosecution strategy.