The PTAB quietly hit a milestone in June in reversing Alice Section 101 rejections

As we have pointed out in a previous post, for more than a year, reversal rates for abstract idea (Alice) rejections have been extremely low. We are finally seeing an uptick of reversals likely due to Berkheimer and other Federal Circuit case law and recent guidance by the USPTO. As we’ve previously predicted, this reversal rate should continue (and may even go up). But until leadership at the USPTO clarifies its policies, it remains to be seen by how much.

As we’ve previously reported, from August 2016 to April 2017, the PTAB had months where it reversed abstract ideas in the 20 and 30 percentage range. That is, if a month had 100 abstract idea decisions, the Board would reverse the examiner on 20 or 30 of those cases. But May 2017 saw a dismal change in appellant fortunes: the reversal rate for abstract idea rejections tanked. For this period of over a year ago, many months saw only single digit reversal rates. Indeed, no month during this time exceeded a 15% reversal rate. The period was bad for Alice appellants.

abstractideareversals

But all this may be starting to change. Last month (June) saw a high number of abstract idea appeals decided, 176. Of those, 29 were wholly reversed, yielding a complete reversal rate of 16.5%.

It may be premature to characterize June as a watershed moment for patent eligibility at the PTAB. But there are three reasons for such hope.

First, June had a sizable number of reversals. In other words, the PTAB did not exceed a 15% reversal rate through a blip attributable to a small sample size. For some context, the number of reversals for the single month of June (29) was almost double the number of reversals for the six months between July 2016 and December 2016 (19).

Month Jul-16 Aug-16 Sep-16 Oct-16 Nov-16 Dec-16 Jan-17 Feb-17 Mar-17 Apr-17 May-17 Jun-17 Jul-17 Aug-17 Sep-17 Oct-17 Nov-17 Dec-17 Jan-18 Feb-18 Mar-18 Apr-18 May-18 Jun-18
Reversal Rate 33% 33% 27% 33% 29% 14% 28% 39% 20% 3% 11% 14% 15% 8% 15% 11% 14% 11% 14% 11% 10% 12% 9% 16%
Reversed 2 2 3 2 7 3 17 15 16 1 7 13 16 7 10 9 8 2 9 8 21 16 15 29
Total 6 6 11 6 24 22 60 38 81 31 63 94 108 93 68 83 56 19 64 73 203 137 172 176

Second, the number of decisions where the Board partially reverses an abstract idea rejection is increasing as well. In June, two decisions partially affirmed such rejections, pushing up the total rate with at least one claim reversed to 17.6%. March saw seven such decisions. These nine decisions for these months are more than the previous 9 months. The partial reversal rate tells a more complete story about how the Board is treating abstract idea rejections. As seen, the Board’s trend is toward increasing both the number of complete reversals and partial reversals. This means that the Board appears more willing to entertain dependent claims as patent-eligible, giving the appellant some options.

Finally, the Board is recently more holistically relying on both steps for reversing. We are starting to see a return to previous months where the PTAB has been more aggressive in reversing these types of rejections. Part of this is due to case law, which the Board follows. Berkheimer and Vanda guidelines may play a role. We previously noted that Berkheimer temporarily changed the way in which panels reverse. That is, whereas before panels primarily relied on Step 1 to overturn an abstract idea rejection, for a few months it was about even as to whether the Board uses Step 1 or Step 2 of the Alice/Mayo framework to reverse. June saw a return to the disproportionate reliance on Step 1 vs Step 2 reversal rationales (2:1). This goes to show that the Board may not be limiting itself to reversing cases just because of a single Federal Circuit decision (Berkheimer), but is developing a less erratic and more cogent way of deciding such rejections.

Why did the PTAB quietly hit this milestone in June? The PTO’s FOIA website, from which a majority of Anticipat’s data comes, has recently been delaying the time it takes to upload decisions to its page. Before a normal data upload would be a few business days and Anticipat Recap emails would play it safe by waiting until two weeks after a particular date to send a recap of a day’s decisions. So while we typically keep users updated on reversals using Recap emails after two weeks, for many days there have been no decisions to report on. Instead, we accessed this information by using the Research page.

After speaking with the USPTO’s webmaster, we were assured that the decisions will be more quickly uploaded going forward. This did not entirely assuage our concerns. So in the meantime, we are updating our Recap email functionality so that a user can modify the email settings to be sent in whatever way is most helpful to one’s practice. Stay tuned for updates very soon.