Board panel citing Berkheimer to reverse judicial exception rejection to diagnostics claims: no evidence

Since the two weeks since we predicted that the PTAB would start to dramatically change its outcomes of rejections under Section 101, we have seen no such change. Since then, recap emails have mostly shown affirmances (only 7 reversals of 86 total Section 101 decisions = 8% reversal rate). But a decision in yesterday’s recap email shows precisely the kind of rejection analysis that is expected to become more mainstream at the PTAB.

Ex Parte Galloway et al (PTAB May 22, 2018) reversed the judicial exception rejection under Section 101 because of a lack of evidence. The panel, consisting of Donald E. Adams, Demetra J. Mills, and Ulrike W. Jenks, found that the Examiner had not provided evidence to support a prima facie case of patent ineligible subject matter.

The panel cited to Berkheimer in support of an apparent defective step 2 analysis: “The Examiner has not established with appropriate factual evidence that the claimed method uses conventional cell counting methods.”

As a stylistic aside, Section 101 rejections are typically presented in decisions toward the very top of the document. It is unclear how or why (it may stem from examiners or practitioners ordering the statutory rejections), but this practice has gone on in the Board’s decisions for several years. However, a recent trend is for the Board to analyze Section 101 after prior art rejections. Now it makes sense why because a lack of a good prior art rejection can make for a good support that step 2 of a Section 101 rejection is improper.

And that is precisely what happened here. The panel proceeded to support its assertion (that step 2 of the Alice/Mayo framework was defective) by referring to its obviousness reversal. In other words, the Board’s finding of non-obvious claims supported that the claim features were not simply conventional or known in the art.

Another interesting point to note about this case is that it reinforces the much higher reversal rates of Section 101 judicial exceptions. The Board’s practice, as in this case, appears to be helping the patent-eligibility of diagnostics inventions.

As the PTAB becomes more confident in using Berkheimer in their decisions, expect more of the same analysis as Ex Parte Galloway. The appeal backlog has far too many cases where the Examiners did not have the guidance of Berkheimer to establish the proper evidence for Step 2. Thus, the necessary analysis from the Board need only be short and crisp.

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