Expect the Berkheimer-driven patent-eligibility pendulum to swing at the PTAB

The past few months have seen huge developments in patent-eligibility at the USPTO. In three and a half years after Alice, the most effective way to argue against patent-eligibility for software applications was to focus on Step 1–that the claims are not directed to an abstract idea. But based on these recent developments, Step 2–that additional elements of the claims transform the judicial exception into something more–looks to be the more powerful way. The only problem is that the PTAB has not yet caught on. It will.

These huge developments have taken place in the form of Federal Circuit decisions deciding patent-eligibility favorably to the patentee, especially Berkheimer v. HP Inc., 881 F.3d 1360, 1369 (Fed. Cir. 2018). Such a clear articulation of the need for factual findings for Step 2 should usher in big change in how the Alice/Mayo framework is applied.

Then on top of the decisions came the revised USPTO Berkheimer memo last month. These guidelines emphasized that to establish under Step 2 that an additional element (or combination of elements) is well-understood, routine or conventional, the examiner must find and expressly support a rejection in writing with one of the four:

1. A citation to an express statement in the specification or to a statement made by an applicant during prosecution that demonstrates the well-understood, routine, conventional nature of the additional element(s).

2. A citation to one or more of the court decisions discussed in MPEP § 2106.05(d)(II) as noting the well-understood, routine, conventional nature of the additional element(s).

3. A citation to a publication that demonstrates the well-understood, routine, conventional nature of the additional element(s).

4. A statement that the examiner is taking official notice of the well-understood, routine, conventional nature of the additional element(s).

It should come as no small surprise to any practitioner that Examiners have not been including the above support in their Step 2 analyses for these additional elements of claims. This is no slight to the examining corps; it simply was never a USPTO requirement. So if the PTAB were faithful to the principles set forth in the guidelines, one would expect a dramatic turning of the tide.

While the PTAB is not bound to the USPTO examiner memos, it shouldn’t stray too far from them. Plus, it must comply with the Federal Circuit decisions, which are consistent with the guidelines. So one wouldn’t expect the PTAB to continue its practice of overwhelmingly affirming on Section 101. However, so far the PTAB has not significantly deviated from its previous course of mostly affirming judicial exception rejections.

Since April 19, 2018–the day that the Berkheimer memo was published–there have been 120 decisions that have decided judicial exceptions. Of these, only 13 have reversed, meaning a reversal rate of 11%. This 11% reversal rate is below the recently reported reverse rate for abstract ideas of 14%. It would appear that panels have not yet had the time to incorporate this new Step 2 framework into their decision-making. Or alternatively, they are preoccupied with the arguments raised by the appellant. Expect a greater number of request for rehearings on these.

Sooner or later, these PTAB judges should realize that many Section 101 rejections on appeal do not have the proper support for Step 2. This is not to say that these Examiners, on remand, could reformulate a proper rejection given another opportunity. While theoretically the judges could affirm the 101 rejections with a designation of new, the Board may not be well-equipped for to do so as this new requirement requires factual basis supporting Step 2. That is, the PTAB is a body that decides the propriety of pending rejections, not a body for searching and making such support findings. So expect a greater number of reversals to let the Examiners follow Berkheimer.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: