PTAB finds encryption software claims not directed to abstract idea–Practice tips

How does the Board incorporate very timely case law in their decisions? How can you use this to your advantage? We consider these questions as we discuss a recent Board decision that reversed an abstract idea rejection while incorporating a very recent Federal Circuit into its analysis.

In a recent decision, Ex parte Jang (March 1, 2018) (available at https://anticipat.com/research?id=104015), the Board reversed an Examiner’s Section 101 rejection. In so doing, the Board panel found that the claimed software invention was not directed to an abstract idea under step 1 of the Alice/Mayo framework. Interestingly, the Board analogized to a Federal Circuit decision that had been decided not six weeks prior.

This recent Federal Circuit decision that the Board cited, Finjan, Inc. v. Blue Coat Sys., Inc., 879 F.3d 1299, 1303 (Fed. Cir. 2018), was not merely a cursory citation or a footnote. Rather, the Board specifically analogized to the patent in Finjan in holding that the claims at issue were similarly not directed to an abstract idea. How did the Board incorporate this legal authority into its own decision so quickly?

One thing that can be ruled out is any help from the appellant. Often times, the Board does indeed borrow persuasive arguments from the applicant (including persuasive legal authority). At times, you can see arguments literally lifted from appellants’ appeal briefs or reply briefs, as discussed in this blog post. Not so here. The reply brief was filed in September of 2016, long before Finjan was decided. Plus, the appellant choose not to pursue an oral hearing, which would have given the appellant a chance to address more recent case law. See 37 CFR 41.47 (“Upon a showing of good cause, appellant and/or the primary examiner may rely on a new argument based upon a recent relevant decision of either the Board or a Federal Court.”).

Instead it appears that PTAB judges keep very current on Federal Circuit case law and use it in their own decision drafting. This is somewhat different from examiners, who, in the face of a recent Federal Circuit decision, may have problems addressing the applicability of recent Federal Circuit decision. The Examiners may instead prefer the USPTO to interpret any new Federal Circuit decisions in an official USPTO guideline.

 

Now that we know that the Board analogizes to recent legal authority, how is this useful? How can you use the fact that the Board regularly cites to recent and relevant case law in reversing Examiner rejections? It turns out that this is most useful in fast-evolving areas of law, such as Section 101. For example, you can cite to the same legal authority that the Board uses to overturn your own Examiner rejections.

As we pointed out in a recent blog post, you can input any application number into the Anticipat Practitioner Analytics input field, and it will show the relevant legal authority for this application. Let’s say that you have an application in the software arts that is meeting stiff Section 101 headwinds. Perhaps, your application is even in the technical space of encryption. Let’s even say art unit 3621 (the same art unit that Ex parte Jang was decided).

After inputting art unit 3621 into the Analytics input field, you will see that the art unit field has legal authority for step 1 of the Alice/Mayo framework. There are three decisions where the Board relied on step 1 of the abstract idea test to reverse the rejection.

artunit3621

Within step 1, you see legal authority that the Board uses to support its reversal by the icon to the immediate right of the tag. This icon, which is clickable, provides all the decisions (and legal authority) for this art unit. It shows this popup for this art unit:

artunitlegal.png

In addition to Finjan, this Board decision used two other Federal Circuit cases in reversing the rejection: Enfish and Thales Visionix.

Chances are that if you have an application in this art unit and are facing a similar stubborn rejection, accessing legal authority that the Board found worthy of overturning an examiner can help guide strategy for what is persuasive. At best, the relevant legal authority is also found to be analogous and persuasive in your case. At worst, you are not completely off-base in citing to such a decision since independent judges in this art unit analogized to such legal authority.

The next column, tech center, has even more decisions and legal authority. Finally, the right-most column displays all the tags for this specific tag. This will provide all the legal authority Board decisions.

This practice tip is well-suited for responding to Office Actions as responses under 1.111 because you can quickly use recent legal authority. In theory, this same legal research could guide an applicant preparing for an appeal. This is especially relevant since if judges are using specific legal authority to overturn specific rejections, chances are they will be receptive to such legal authority in your brief. However, due to the substantial delay in reaching a final decision, and due to the volatility of Section 101, some of the cases may be outdated by the time the panel decides your case.

See what Practitioner Analytics can do for your practice. Feel free to give Analytics a 14-day free trial.

Let us know if you have any questions or if you would like a demo.

Anticipat Team

One response

  1. Pingback: Business methods making comeback on appeal at the Board–Citing Berkheimer PTAB panel holds Examiner must show evidence | Anticipat Blog

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