Practice Tip: Do not recite an abstract idea in claims while merely adding the words ‘apply it’

Alice v. CLS Bank in citing Mayo made one point very clear: stating an abstract idea while adding the words ‘apply it’ is not enough for patent eligibility. This point may seem apparent to patent practitioners who hopefully are not literally reciting abstract ideas in claims and adding “apply it”. But a recent ex parte appeals decision highlights how a more common claim may fall into this same patent-ineligible category.

In Ex Parte Perreault (PTAB Jan. 24, 2018), the Board assessed an extraordinary representative claim for patent-eligibility. This single claim spans five pages of the Board decision, tallying up an impressive 1100-word count. The final clause of the claim recites:

wherein said steps (a)(l)(i), (a)(l)(v), (a)(l)(vi), (b)(l)(i), (b)(l)(v), (b)(l)(vi), and (c) are performed by execution, on a processor of a computer, of computer-readable instructions contained on a non-transitory computer readable medium.

The Board was unconvinced of the appellant’s arguments and instead held that the claim was directed to gathering rules and remedies for each community and then displaying them to a sub-contractor. The fact that the claim recited the equivalent of “apply it” in the final element was no help to the patent-eligiblity of the claim.

The Board instead found that the claim includes neither a technical problem nor a technical solution, but merely the application of an abstract idea on a computer via the Internet. Then the final blow: “We have repeatedly held that such invocations of computers and networks that are not even arguably inventive are insufficient to pass the test of an inventive concept in the application of an abstract idea.” Elec. Power Grp., LLC v. Alstom S.A., 830 F.3d 1350, 1355 (Fed. Cir. 2016).

In conclusion, lengthy claims are not helped by merely reciting generic computer and network language. A final step with a wherein clause clarifying that previous steps are performed on a computer is perhaps a sign that the claim off course from patent-eligibility.

One response

  1. Pingback: #anticipat advocates tricking #uspto #patent examiners for #swpats … | Dr. Roy Schestowitz (罗伊)

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