Which law firms are successful in overturning abstract idea rejections on appeal?

For difficult grounds of rejection, the right advocacy can make all the difference. The right counsel can know when to appeal and how to win on appeal. Here, we explore the demographic of firms that represent appellants that overturn one of the most difficult of all rejections: Section 101 abstract idea. Recent data show that while some big/specialized firms are successful, others without the same name recognition also are doing relatively well.

We have previously reported that in the post-Alice era, the PTAB reverses abstract idea rejections about 17% of the time. Updated for the past few months (blog post forthcoming), this overall rate has dipped. But this low percentage still represents a sizeable 135 decisions over the past year and a half (specifically, July 25, 2017 through December 1, 2017). This span of time represents the applications that are most likely to have been issued a post-Alice rejection and subsequently appealed. It turns out that select firms make up a good share of these successes, followed by a long tail of single reversals per firm.

Two firms immediately stand out from the pack: Morgan Lewis and Schwegman, Lundberg & Woessner. These firms each have 5 reversed decisions on appeal, a laudable number in this post-Alice climate.

Next are firms each having three reversals: Cuenot, Forsythe & Kim and Brinks Gilson and Lione (stemming from three related applications issued the same day).

Next come the firms/companies with two reversals apiece (arranged alphabetically):

Finally, there are 90 other firms/corporations/pro se applicants who have achieved one reversal (see end of post for names).

Our methodology involved using Anticipat Research database to find all reversed Section 101 decisions decided on abstract idea grounds. We then identified the law firm/corporation who signed the reply brief or appeal brief and crediting them with the reversal.

Two things are clear from these data: First, some firms are really quite good (relatively speaking) at appealing abstract idea rejections–even in the face of fast-evolving case law and various application filing dates (pre- and post-Alice). Make no mistake, a firm that can overturn an abstract idea rejection several times over the past year and a half is not doing so out of luck.

Additional research is needed into normalizing these data, which could identify whether these successful firms are achieving such high reversals by appealing much more frequently than others. However, Morgan Lewis and Schwegman would need to appeal quite a bit more than others for their high reversals to be explained only from sheer numbers of ex parte appeals.

Another related question relates to firms having smaller patent prosecution practices. Do these firms’ reversal numbers come in the face of handling a much smaller number of cases than bigger patent prosecution firms? This would indicate that smaller firms are in fact equally if not more successful than the Morgan Lewis and Schwegman types.

The second point that is clear is that a broad diversity of counsel succeeds in appealing abstract idea rejections. Counsel ranges from firms in big cities with the highest of billable rates to boutiques in smaller cities who carry much lower overhead. Solo practitioners also win and even pro se appellants succeed on Section 101 appeals. Common wisdom may suggest that you get what you pay for in patent counsel, and that a high stakes appeal of such a difficult rejection requires a Tom Brady billable rate. But the data show a broad range of counsel are successful, indicating that a superstar billable rate is not required to overturn an abstract idea rejection on appeal.

These two points strike at an interesting concluding point. While there are some certainties in navigating the abstract idea waters, there is a great deal of uncertainties. For the certainties, a certain level of legal sophistication and experience may be needed to successfully argue an abstract idea rejection at the PTAB (persuasive writing and rebutting the Examiner’s points with the right, relevant case law).

For the uncertainties, Section 101 case law has been evolving very regularly since Alice, meaning that there is a large amount of unpredictability and volatility. That being said, having the most up-to-date data available on Section 101 ex parte appeals can equip any counsel with the right tools. Anticipat Practitioner Analytics lets you see the reversal rates for certain Examiners, art units, and tech centers for all types of rejections. It also shows you the most often cited case law used by the PTAB for abstract idea grounds of rejection. Watch this YouTube video for more information or check out this page here: https://anticipat.com/accounts/signup/analytics/ Sign up now for a free trial.

 

As discussed above, here are the firms with one reversal, sorted alphabetically:

 

4 responses

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  4. Pingback: Update to firms that overturn abstract idea (Alice) rejections on appeal at PTAB « Anticipat Blog

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